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Posted by Marissa Shieh

Ice cream sky

No junk food is safe.

What if a nasal spray could make food look less appetizing? According to a new study, an insulin spray has that effect on some people. Read on.

Reality check

Jul. 20th, 2017 09:54 pm
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As President Trump finishes his first half-year in office, we look at which campaign promises he's fulfilled.

Hamilkitties!

Jul. 20th, 2017 03:09 pm
rachelmanija: (It was a monkey!)
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Curious Alex.





Erin, waiting for it.

Toronto's Natrel Milk Bar shuts down

Jul. 20th, 2017 05:19 pm
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Posted by Staff

Another Toronto milk bar has joined the deadpool. The relatively short-lived Natrel Milk Bar by Montreal's Java U has shut down.

The cafe, which highlighted products from milk company Natrel, took over the space at 1092 Queen St. W. It was previously home to the "Drake you ho, this is all your fault" Starbucks.

After that West Queen West Starbucks closed, some hoped sort of indie retailer or restaurant would replace it. Instead, Queen and Dovercourt got a splashy brand activation for big dairy.

Now, the only milk bar left in Toronto is Momofuku's. Moo Milk Bar in the Beaches shut down a few years ago. 

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Posted by Phil Villeneuve

For much of the summer, the city's been cut off from the Toronto Islands. While folks can indeed visit parts of this urban oasis via the Ward's Island ferry, the Toronto Island Park is still off limits.

Are things really that bad? Photographer Aidan Ferreira ventured to the parts of the Islands most affected by the flooding earlier this month to discover a deserted, overgrown paradise

island flood toronto

A field on Centre Island. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

On Centre Island, which is supposed to open by early August, there are ponds and mud pits where once green landscape existed. 

toronto island flood

Submerged bleachers on Centre Island. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

Remember the infamous carp pond that was once a baseball field? Water levels have gone down, so the massive fish are no longer there, but it's basically a wetland.

toronto island flood

Spot the heron at the back of this shot. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

What was once a baseball field near Gibraltar Point is now home to small aquatic life and larger birds. 

toronto island flood

Frisbee golf hole on Centre Island. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

By the looks of things, frisbee golf will most likely not be happening this summer as parts of Centre Island remain underwater.

toronto island flood

A bridge to nowhere. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

The bridge to the small Snake Island now leads nowhere. 

toronto island flood

Centreville and its various kids' rides remain closed. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

This is the ramp and dock for Centreville Theme Park's swan ride. Centreville hasn't been able to open this summer. It's reportedly lost millions of dollars and had to sell its historic carousel.

toronto island flood

The northern edge of Hanlan's is blocked off and lined with fallen trees and branches. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

Though there is some beach left at Hanlan's Point, it won't open this summer. There's a gate up deterring people from entering the area and many trees that lined the edge of beach have fallen down.

toronto island flood

One of the remaining duck families. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

The photographer notes there are usually dozens of families of ducks floating around the island, but that this year, many of the nests and eggs were submerged. He's noticed fewer flocks swimming around. 

toronto island flood

The Gibralter Point Lighthouse. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

Gibraltar Point will remain closed for the rest of the summer. Good luck getting there without wearing waist-high rubber boots. 

toronto island flood

The Island Cafe is still open for business. Photo by Aidan Ferreira.

While the Toronto Islands are still drying out, the Ward's Island ferry runs every day. Businesses, such as The Island Cafe and the Rectory Cafe, are still open and ready to welcome visitors. 

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Posted by Amy Grief

One of Toronto's most well-known chefs looks like he's getting ready to open his newest restaurant. But instead of fine (or fine-ish) dining, this incoming spot might veer towards fast food.

Lee recently posted in the popular Food and Wine Industry Navigator Facebook group that he was looking for a chef to spearhead "an upcoming quick-serve, high volume, health-driven food concept."

"The health driven menu will be inspired by the ingredients and flavours of east Asia blended with international influences from the Western Hemisphere," he continued.

"It’s an exciting new concept Chef Lee is working on with his sons however nothing has been finalized," said a public relations representative for Lee via email.

Details about this new venture remain sparse for now.

Earlier this year, Lee shut down Bent on Dundas Street West. A new brewery looks like it's going to be replacing it. 

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Posted by Derek Flack

There are major changes afoot at Queen and Parliament as the former Marty Millionaire space is transformed into a gorgeous new brick-and-beam office for WE Charity's Global Learning Centre, but along the way a bit of Toronto's forgotten past has been revealed.

Now that the scaffolding along Queen Street East has come down, the restoration of the building's exterior reveals the entrance to the old Home Bowling Club, which once occupied the sprawling second floor of this warehouse building.

queen parliament toronto

What the building looked like in 1914 prior to the bowling alley, which would eventually occupy the second floor. Photo via the Toronto Archives.

The building dates back to 1907 when it opened as John Francis Brown's Home Furniture Carpet Co. The bowling alley opened in 1925 or 1926. As the former entrance is slowly restored, the original signage is once again on display.

The entrance has in fact long been visible from Queen Street, but it was previously covered in teal paint, which obscured its former use. Believe it or not, the bowling alley it led to was in operation all the way until 1978, when Marty Millionaire took over the space.

A post shared by Henry Vanderspek (@culturesnap) on

When bowling alleys were at the height of their popularity in the 1960s and 70s, they were often accompanied by ostentatious signage. Not so here. In fact, there's actually considerable elegance to the arched entryway marked simply with "BOWLING."

It's one of the better ghost signs you'll spot in Toronto.

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